Archive | October 2014

Parliament House and Old Melbourne Gaol

This week we went on an excursion to

Parliament House and the Old Melbourne Gaol.

Our visit was part of our study on Law and Order.

It was very exciting seeing exactly where our laws are made. We were very lucky because Parliament was not sitting, so we were able to go into the Lower and Upper Houses of Parliament and actually sit in the ministers’ seats, to get a feel of what it was like. We were also able to go into the Library which is in Parliament, and which the Ministers of Parliament use.

After our visit to Parliament House we went to the Old Melbourne Gaol.

Again, as part of Law and Order, we became the actors, and had to re-enact Ned Kelly’s trial. We put on costumes, and some of us even got to wear wigs!! We learnt that Ned Kelly did not really get a fair trial, because of the barrister who was representing him, and also because he was not allowed to present his case. We learnt that the courtroom at the time of Ned’s trial was very noisy and crowded. The judge who sentenced Ned also died 12 days after Ned was hanged.

This was a great history lesson.

Some of us now think that maybe we might become lawyers!

We also spent some time in the old part of the Old Melbourne Gaol which was actually the original Melbourne Men’s Hospital. This was where Ned Kelly and other prisoners were taken to recover from their wounds. Sadly, once healed, Ned Kelly had to face his trial and his sentence.

Here are some photos of our excursion. We hope you enjoy them.

 Parliament House and Courtroom Drama – Old Melbourne Gaol on PhotoPeach

POLAR OPPOSITES by Karl Tyson

Our thanks to Karl Tyson for this very cute video “Polar Opposites”. 

The characters have so much personality, and they certainly teach us a lesson.

Practice and patience certainly pay off, as does lending a helping hand.

What did you think about these cute characters?

How would you behave in a similar situation?

Would you do something special for a friend who is feeling down,

without expecting thanks?

Maths Problem Solving – Challenges!

Can you solve these puzzles?

HOW MANY SQUARES

HOW MANY SQUARES QUESTION

 

Capture

What symbol should come next in the sequence? 

find the path

Can you solve this riddle?

It is able, but not capable.
It can stop, but not go.
It is dead, but not yet perished.
It’s a ghost, but not paranormal.

Is it high, or is it low?

We acknowledge and thank the Numeracy Shed
as well as all contributors for these puzzles.

Australian Prime Ministers – Caricatures!

This week, we have been looking at Australian Prime Ministers.

So we decided to look at different artists and cartoonists for some inspiration for our artwork.

We gratefully acknowledge and thank the many talented cartoonists

for their inspiration on which our artwork is based.

St. Mary of the Cross MacKillop and St. Patrick’s Cathedral

As part of our reflection and preparation for the Sacrament of Confirmation, we attended the Mary MacKillop Heritage Centre and St. Patrick’s Cathedral.  The Sisters of Saint Joseph guided us through the centre and we learnt about the history and life of Mary MacKillop. We then visited the birthplace of Mary MacKillop, where we saw a plaque marking the birth site of the Saint. We spent some time in the garden in prayer. From there we went to the ACU where we saw a beautiful statue of a young Mary MacKillop, and followed a number of plaques of the milestones in her life. After having lunch in the Fitzroy Gardens we set out to visit St. Patrick’s Cathedral. We thank Father Benedict for accompanying us on our excursion today. We thank him for being our official guide, especially at St. Patrick’s Cathedral. We learnt so much about the history of the Cathedral and about all the different chapels in the cathedral. Today was a wonderful and educational experience and assisted us in our spiritual and reflective journey as we prepare for our Confirmation. Below is a slideshow of our journey today.

What did you think of our excursion today?

What did you learn?

What were two things which stood out for you about

St. Mary of the Cross MacKillop?

What do you remember about St. Patrick’s Cathedral?

Write back and tell me your thoughts.

Civics and Citizenship – The Australian Government

Hi everyone,

I know you are all well and truly into our new Integrated Studies topic,

Civics and Citizenship – Law and Order.

On the slideshow below you will find a number of videos

which will help explain our system of government. 

Hopefully it will help you gain a better understanding

about the country in which you live,

and also help you to appreciate and know what some of your

rights and responsibilities are as a citizen and community member.

Please be patient as there are many videos which may need time to load.

 

 

Saints – The Process of Canonisation

Hi Everyone,

I know you have just started making a decision about a Saint to choose for your Confirmation. Below is a short video on how the Catholic Church goes about making someone a Saint. I know you will find it very interesting, and it is very easy to follow.

You will also find a definition of a Saint below the video, as well as an extract on Who is a Saint. Ask your parents to read it with you so that you and your family understand what a Saint is.

At the end of the extract, I have included some links to help you choose a Saint, to begin your research

The Concise Oxford Dictionary defines a Saint as:

  • holy, canonized or officially recognized by the church as having won by exceptional holiness a high place in heaven and veneration on earth.

  • member of the company of heaven, canonized person, one of God’s chosen people.

Who is a Saint? extract from This is our Faith. by Michael Francis Pennock. pp224 – 225

Every Christian is called to be a saint, that is, every disciple of Jesus is called to be holy. A saint is a good person. Saints are people who always choose the better of two courses open to them. Saints are christian models of holiness. To believe in christian heroes and to learn from their lives can inspire us to do heroic deeds of service ourselves on our own journey to holiness.

Under the guidance of the Holy Spirit, the Catholic church will sometimes declare that a person who lived a good life and died a death joined to Jesus is a saint. The process leading to adding a person’s name to the list of saints (a process known as canonization) involves a careful study of that person’s life and a sign from God (usually miracles performed in that person’s name) that this person is truly a saint and worthy of our imitation. When the church honours a saint, the church is praising God who shares his life of holiness with us, his creatures.

Every person in heaven is truly a saint, whether canonized or not. Some of these saints maybe our own deceased friends and relatives. The church honours all these good people on All Saints Day. In some countries, All Saints Day is celebrated as a holy day, a day of truly celebrating the countless number of people who have lived good, holy lives and are now sharing in God’s life and happiness in heaven.

Saints Directory

Discovering our Saints

Australia’s Federation and Edmund Barton

And here is a short historical note on Edmund Barton, the first elected Prime Minister of Australia.

Edmund Barton (1849–1920)
Edmund Barton was born in Glebe, New South Wales and became Australia’s first prime minister. He was a very good student who was captain of his school and won many prizes at university. He worked as a lawyer in Sydney and in 1879 became a member of the New South Wales Parliament.

Barton believed that the Australian colonies should join together (federate) and become one nation and he made many speeches to convince other people to support the idea. In 1901, when the Australian states joined together (federated), Barton was asked to be the stand-in prime minister until elections could be held. He was then elected as prime minister. In 1903 he left the Commonwealth Parliament to become a High Court judge.

In Canberra, all of the older suburbs are named after prime ministers of Australia. One of the first suburbs was named ‘Barton’. He has also been commemorated on stamps.

The above article is from the link below. You may follow it to many other interesting articles on our history and government.

CIVICS AND CITIZENSHIP

Mathematics: Reflection, Translation, Rotation,Tessellating Patterns & Perspective!

We have recently completed our study of

Reflection, Translation and Rotation in Mathematics.

Or in other words, flip, slide, turn!

We also designed tessellating patterns and perspectives!

Here are some of our efforts.

This unit was a lot of fun and enjoyed by all.

We hope you enjoy watching our videos! Please feel free to leave a comment!